TERMS

Timber Grading – Solid

French Oak is different from other timbers including other species of Oak. The nature of this tree creates small branches that lead to swirling grain. The French Oak tree is sectioned into four parts, with an average length of 2.4 – 2.6 metres being cut. Other Oaks, such as American Oak will display a straighter grain and also clearer timber.

  • Prime Grade is clear face with tight knots up to 5mm and no sap tolerated with limited colour variation
  • Select Grade is tight knots up to 25mm, sap up to 5% of order, some colour variation
  • Rustic Grade has larger knots up to 50mm, colour variation, sap, heart and traces of Brown Oak.
  • Brown Oak is a specific grade that uses mature trees, which have discoloured. Typically these trees are in excess of 350 years of ages.

 

 

Timber Grading – Engineered

Grading for engineered is slightly different but can be explained as follows;

  • A Grade – no knots, no sap, clear face boards
  • B Grade – tight small knots, sap tolerance,
  • C Grade – larger repaired knots, sap tolerance,
  • D Grade – larger open knots repaired, cracks and sap tolerance

 

Timber Profiles

All flooring both engineered and solid, parquet and strip flooring is available in different profiles.

  • Flat top – designed for site finishing, any undulations will be corrected through sanding works on site.
  • Micro-bevel – is defined as a small bevel up to 2mm that will define each piece without creating a broad v-joint. It is expected during installation that slight variation of up to 1.5mm may be detected between boards due to tolerances in tongue and groove machining, without these tolerances boards cannot be fitted.
  • Bevel – is defined as a small bevel greater than 2mm that will define each piece will create a more pronounced v-joint. It is expected during installation that slight variation of up to 1.5mm may be detected between boards due to tolerances in tongue and groove machining, without these tolerances boards cannot be fitted.

 

Colouring

Fuming is a natural reaction of the timber to chemical exposure. This normally takes place naturally during the life of Oak, which will generate different colours according to the intensity and duration of the exposures. Each piece of timber will react differently and generate different tones and variation between pieces and within a piece. When we treat the timber, we aim for a uniform colour range. If you require this to be more uniform, we need to allow for more timber to be fumed and will colour match after fuming. Any knots that are repaired prior to fuming may require further puttying after installation to better match.

When fuming, the inclusion of sap must also be considered. If no tolerance for sapping in a finished floor is required and not expressed by Renaissance Parquet it will be considered included within grading tolerances. Any rejection of material on site outside of quoted and grading tolerances will be done so as a variation at an additional cost.

 

Bleaching is a process of removing the tannin from the Oak. It will whiten the timber making it a great base for different colours or trying to achieve a natural white floor.

 

Staining is the application of colour to the timber on raw, fumed, bleached or oxidized Oak. Staining will differ between products used, but will generally highlight the grain.

 

Oxidizing is a chemical solution applied in sequence to react with the timber for a desired colour. This is a very difficult process and one that we prefer not to execute on site.

 

Textures

Wire Brushing: removal of soft grain from the timber. The amount can be controlled to give more texture or light surface texture. It has the advantage to make the surface harder and more durable.

 

Hand-scrapping: is a removal of surface material by blade or scrapper. This was the original system for finishing floor before sanding was invented. Scrapping can be done to follow the grain and give a worn natural look. It must be done by hand.

 

Sand blasting: is the use of abrasive and air pressure to remove soft grain and create texture. The pitting cause by this process needs to be remove with brushing. But it will create a more irregular surface then brushing alone.

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